The 14 Words

Thursday, 5 December 2013

Canada’s Misplaced Altruism Cost Billion$

CANADA’S “REFUGEE” SYSTEM HAS SHOVELLED BILLION$ TO ABUSERS

From “Abusing Canada’s Generosity and Ignoring Genuine Refugees”
Published By Frontier Centre for Public Policy

By James Bissett

It is estimated that roughly 800,000 asylum seekers entered Canada (between 1985 and 2010). [Those numbers of unknown foreigners who were foolishly allowed to enter OUR country without hardly a whimper, EXCEED the entire population of Winnipeg, Manitoba >ELN Editor]


In the years 2008 to 2010, over 70,000 claims were registered. This is almost 3,000 per month, and considering there is already a backlog of approximately 60,000 claims before the IRB, it is not alarmist to think that the system is out of control.

( Editor’s Note : IRB (Immigration and Refugee Board), is a group of lay people (not having specialized or professional knowledge of a subject, and even former “refugees” themselves) who determine whether a person is eligible to be given refugee status)

In 2009, Canada became the 3rd largest receiver of asylum seekers (33,000) in theWestern world after the United States (49,000) and France (42,000). On a per capitabasis, however, we rank number one with one claim for every 1,000 people compared with the United States with one claim per 11,000 people.

In BRITAIN … a bogus “refugee” easily scams his way into the country with unsolicited advice/help by an enabling female border control officer. View this video:




[Also read: Playing The "Refugee" Game]

Perhaps the most insidious feature of Canada’s asylum system has been its enormous financial cost and the naïve presumption that the sums involved are justified because we are, in fact, “helping refugees“.




Unfortunately, it is difficult to determine the actual costs because they are spread over three levels of government—federal, provincial and local — and involve a wide variety of activities such as housing, welfare, legal fees, medical care and, of course, the operational cost of the IRB itself, which (amounted to just over $117-million in 2010).

The chameleon-like character of asylum seekers also makes it difficult to determine costs. These people undergo a transformation of status after arriving in Canada.

If the IRB refuses their claim, they become a “failed asylum seeker” and are subject to removal pending any appeals submitted.

However, if their claim is accepted, they are given refugee status. Then, as a refugee, they are eligible to apply for permanent residence (PR) status, and if accepted, their status changes (again) to that of “immigrant”. Different costs are involved at each stage of the transformation of status.

(ELN Editor’s Note: At the same time, we have skilled and qualified European peoples who must wait in line for years to have their immigrant documents approved … BEFORE setting their foot on Canadian soil.)
In 2008, Canada received 37,000 asylum seekers and approximately 60% of these will be refused refugee status by the IRB. Since the government estimates eachfailed asylum seeker costs $50,000, we can calculate that in 2008 the taxpayers faced a bill of approximately $1.11-billion just to deal with the number of refused cases in the 2008 flow.

Added to the costs are those required to deal with the existing backlog (of 60,000). Even if the costs of the 2008 failed cases are subtracted from the backlog, its numbers have been supplemented by the 33,000 new asylum arrivals in 2009 so the back-log figure of 60,000 would remain at approximately the current level. The costs of dealing with its failure rate of approximately 60 percent would be close to $1.8-billion.

Unfortunately, we are not told if the $50,000 cost figure for (each) failed case is an annual cost, or if it is the total cost involved from refusal of the claimant to eventual removal from Canada. Nor are we informed of the costs of those asylum seekers who are given refugee status by the IRB. The costs do not end when the asylum seeker becomes a “refugee”.

Although it may never be possible to determine the true cost of our asylum system, it is obvious that the current system is terribly expensive and cries out for reform.

John L. Manion, who was a senior bureaucrat experienced in government financing, a former Deputy Minister of Immigration, Secretary of the Treasury Board, and Associate Clerk of the Privy Council, thought the costs of Canada’s dysfunctional asylum system were in the billions of dollars.

(Editor’s Note: Manion estimated the cost of the refugee system to be a significant part of the total of $4 Billion ($4,000,000,000) spent per year on immigration and refugee programs.)
After his retirement, he wrote letters to two immigration ministers, Sergio Marchi andElinor Caplan, urging them to initiate reform of the system, even if it meant using the notwithstanding clause of the Charter. He did not even get an acknowledgement to his letters.

The Department of Citizenship and Immigration has a lavish grants program that gives money to organizations, agencies and community groups that help immigrants and refugees become settled, and that assist them in finding employment, language training and housing. The money is often channelled through agreements with the provinces or given directly to specific agencies. The allocation for 2010-2011 forAlberta was $60,000,000; British Columbia, $114,000,000; Ontario, $408,000,000; and Quebec, $253,700,000. The remaining provinces and territories received $57.7-million, for a total of $893.4-million. Asylum seekers are the beneficiaries of some of this funding.

[Imagine how those funds could benefit our Canadian towns and cities by re-building our paved roads and other needed infrastructure repairs, or building new libraries, or sports facilities, etc. for our own people!! >ELN Editor]
Asylum seekers also receive services from organizations and groups that are given direct financial grants from Citizenship and Immigration. In the period from October 1 to December 31, 2009, almost 200 agencies across Canada received grants of more than $25,000. Sixty of those agencies were awarded contributions in excess of $1-million. For example, the South Asian Family Support Services of Toronto received $13-million, the Settlement and Integration Services of Hamilton received $9-million, and nine Ottawa-area groups received $9.5-million (Disclosure, 2010).

The total allotted for contributions to the settlement program in the Main Estimates for 2010-2011 was $651,749,278.

Canadians pay a high price for an asylum system that finds 60 per cent of those assisted to be false refugees. It becomes even more scandalous when compared with the cost of other organizations or programs. One can only surmise what an injection of $2-billion to $3-billion more would do if directed at improving Canada’s [own] health or educational programs, or reducing the deficit. In a time of alleged austerity and government deficits, it would seem there is no shortage of funding for refugees and immigrants.

Prior to the 1990s, it was expected that the immigrants selected to join the labour force would become established within a year and those sponsored by their relatives in Canada would be looked after by the “sponsoring family” and would not be eligible for government assistance. Even refugees selected from camps abroad were expected to be on their own within a year, and they could expect only minimal financial help during their first year in Canada.

Why is it now assumed that immigrants and “refugees” require massive injections of [our] tax dollars to help them become established in their new country? Could it be that government funding to ethnic and other groups dedicated to helping “refugees” and immigrants is designed more to enlist the political support of these groups than it is to provide help to needy newcomers?

These handouts are not widely publicized by government, and few Canadians are aware of the millions (BILLION$ ??) of dollars devoted to these programs.





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